Download Filipino Sign Language Font 2

MCCID FSL FONT complete
Learn Sign Language through your keyboard. Download the first ever Filipino Sign Language Font. You may freely use this font for personal or commercial use. However, a kind gesture of mentioning our school’s name would be highly appreciated. https://www.mccid.edu.ph
The MCCID FSL Font has all the equivalent alphabets and numeric characters that are used in finger spelling and hand sign. The hands used are similar to those with white gloves so special markings like fingernails and hand lines don’t appear. The characters are comic like to make the letters more clear and easier to copy.

MCCID FSL Font is different from other sign language fonts because it presents the uniquely Filipino signs of the letters “E” and “G”. Aside from that, it also has equivalent hand signs for 29 special keyboard characters including the ampersand (&), dollar ($), per cent (%), etc. A total of 65 characters are represented in signs.
MCCID aims for the font to be accessed and installed freely to anybody’s computers in order to promote the learning of sign language and increase people’s awareness in learning this special language of the Deaf people.

MCCID FSL Font 1.0 Features

  • MCCID FSL Font first version is only 135 kb.
  • MCCID FSL Font is a True Type Font. The primary strength of TrueType was originally that it offered font developers a high degree of control over precisely how their fonts are displayed, right down to particular pixels, at various font heights.
  • It can be installed into any PC with Windows Operating System as well as Apple Mac OS 10 and above. It has also been tested for Linux Based OS (Ubuntu).
  • Lower case and upper case hand letters are the same.
  • MCCID FSL Font is a Regular Font. It means you can convert each character into Boldface and Italics.
  • As a dingbat font, MCCID FSL Font does not appear clearly on font size lower than 90. You can better appreciate the font if you change the character size to 100 and above. 300 is the recommended font size.
  • Unlike the Gallaudet American Sign Language Font, British Sign Language Font or Braille Fonts, the MCCID FSL Font offers more than 50 equivalent keyboard characters except for the tilde (~), caret (^) and closed apostrophe (`).

MCCID FSL Font 2 Features

  • MCCID FSL Font 2.0 is slightly lighter at 101kb.
  • Aside from the True Type Font (TTF), MCCID FSL Font is now available in Open Type Font (OTF) which offers a more extended characters. OTF is a joint effort of Microsoft and Adobe and is now more commonly used.
  • The fonts are now with smoother and more realistic hands inside the white gloves.
  • MCCID FSL Font 2 now appears clearly on sizes above 60.
  • The fingerspell of letter “C” is corrected.
  • MCCID FSL Font 2 now offers 72 characters or an additional of twelve from the previous version. Special characters like 1/2, 1/4, division symbol and enye are added.

Download the font by clicking on the link below:

MCCID FSL Font 2.0

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Yay! First 450,000th Visits!

Yehey! I reached a new milestone in my blogging career! I reached my first 450,000th visits! Wait, there’s more! I already reached more than a decade of my blogging career!

Imagine, I have been blogging for eleven years! According to my WordPress Stats, I created this blog in March 6, 2007 when I published my own “Hello World” post.  It had only 18 views. But then I did not consider that as my real post because I was not really that serious in blogging. I made my “real” post more than a year later. I revived my blog by posting on April  27, 2008 because I want to pursue an ongoing news about deaf tourists being offloaded by a budget airline.

On that same month, I was excited to blog so I posted four more. The posts were about our school’s provincial house visits to families of our deaf students. Those were truly both fun and “pissed off” experience for me. A month afterwards, I had my first 1,000 Visits!

Actually, it’s already 452,588 views based on WordPress Stats so I am late celebrating. I have now published 413 blog posts. I also accumulated 284 email followers and 46 wordpress.com followers.

To my faithful readers, thank you thank you very much. Now, on to my next 500,000th visitors. 🙂

 

Filipino Sign Language App ready for download at Google Play

Friends, may I invite you to download and test this app in your Android Phone? I called it Filipino Sign Language (FSL) app. It was quietly released in March 17 and is now on its Version 1.5.  It’s a simple informative program that teaches how to fingerspell letters, numbers and special characters using Filipino Sign Language. I designed this as part of the instructional materials in sign language course offering of MCCID College both in classroom and soon to be online. You can download it for free at Google Play Store.

As an added feature, I included a video of the Philippine National Anthem signed by our deaf student using FSL with instructions on how to sign it. It uses the FSL font, the first and only one of its kind which was exclusively designed and distributed freely by MCCID. It upholds one of our school’s major advocacy of recognizing and spreading the use of indigenous signs.

Designing and developing android applications will also be part of our curricular offerings in the very near future. We have already introduced JavaScript programming in our program last school year and will soon add app development using Java in the coming months.

Although this app is the first full-featured app that was launched in Google Play Store and is now in Version 1.5, there will be more promising FSL apps that will come out in the future and are currently in the development stage. There are also apps that are especially developed and used by religious groups. Let us support all of them.

You may download the app by either going to Google PlayStore and search “Filipino Sign Language” or click on the image below to go directly to download page

Google Play Screen

or click on the link below from our official website using your android smart phone and install it directly.

fsl.apk file

front.fwlupanghinirang.fw.pngpesos.fw.pngcharacters.fw.pnga.fw.pngmenu.fw.png

This latest release was updated based on users’ feedbacks. This update includes:

  • adding exit button on every page when back pressed
  • modified the fonts used in images for clearer view
  • converted images into labels
  • added captions on Philippine National Anthem video with instructions on how to sign.

Feel free to make comments and suggestions on how to improve the app. Thanks!!!

 

 

 

Deaf man, sign language teacher form lasting bond

Belated Happy Valentine’s Day to all my readers! Sorry for not blogging for more than a month now.

Today, may I share with you a post-Valentine love story of a deaf man and his sign language teacher which was published in the Philippine Daily Inquirer? I know personally the lady teacher here, Mrs. Beatriz Go.

More fondly called as Ma’am Beth in the deaf community, she has been one of my wonderful inspirations in the deaf world and at the same time belongs to one of those looked up pillars in Filipino Deaf education. Although she did not became my sign language mentor, her awesome dedication to the teaching of sign language manifests as the long-time coordinator of Philippine Registry of Interpreters for the Deaf (PRID), a pioneering sign language training institution in the country.

As one of the products of PRID and was recently awarded as one of its Outstanding Graduates, I have observed her caring for the welfare of sign language. Well enough about me. I have re-posted the article below written by Jodee Agoncillo. To Ma’am Beth, you are truly an amazing woman. So guys! Be inspired. Be very inspired. 🙂

Love story beyond words

Deaf man, sign language teacher form lasting bond

10:32 pm | Wednesday, February 13th, 2013

 16 392 354

 

ROMANCE UNSPOKEN YET ENDURING Beatriz Go with husband Alexander, children Anthony Benedict, Abigail Bernadette, Albert Noel and the adopted Jasmine

 

Beatriz Go has never heard her husband say “I love you.” She has heard no love song, no sweet nothings, from the man she has been living with for the last 35 years.

Instead, Alexander, being deaf, has loved her in ways that go beyond words.

She’s 66 while he’s 53. A former nun, she used to be his sign language instructor at the Philippine School for the Deaf in Pasay City. The wide age gap being no barrier, his special needs led him to her and her special calling found a vessel in him.

Today they form the pillars of a family of 10—including three children of their own and five more who are adopted. Three of the adopted children are also deaf.

“It just happened.  He was 22 when he started making an effort for me,” said Go, whose face may be familiar to televiewers as the sign language interpreter on TV Masses and previously on the public service program “Kapwa Ko, Mahal Ko.”

“He would come over just to cook for me or bring me lunch. He lived on España, Manila, but would always be my escort taking me home to Pembo, Makati City. He was that consistent,” she said.

One summer, Alexander went on a solo trip to Marinduque province to see her family and ask for her hand in marriage.

There he met some stiff opposition: Some of her relatives disapproved, citing potential “communication problems” between the two. They also saw him becoming a mere dependent because of his disability. Others found the May-December romance too good to be true, and saw something awkward when a student hooks up with a former teacher.

But by then, Go was already in love as well.

Thirty-five years of blissful marriage later, Go said she still catches Alexander, now a retired electrician, telling his friends about their unusual love story—in sign language, of course.

Like any normal couple, they also have occasional spats, usually over the family finances. But such misunderstandings are often resolved especially with the help of Sarah, 42, one of their adopted deaf children, who mediates also through sign language and “interprets our conversations more accurately.”

“We complement each other,” Go said. “Our age gap and physical limitations have never been a hindrance. I defer to him as the head of the family. I guess that’s the secret of our relationship. I am not the nagging, demanding type; I’ve never even gotten hold of his ATM.”

Go currently works at the Philippine Registry of Interpreters for the Deaf. Inevitably, the principles that guide her at work have found real-life applications in her relationship both with her husband and their deaf children.

“Deaf people mostly feel that they are alone because most of their family members don’t get to learn sign language. They need someone to understand them,” she said.

“They are generally suspicious of other people; when they see someone laughing, they think it’s about them. They won’t give their trust unless you show that you are really interested in them.”

Alexander must have overcome these doubts, these suspicions, the day she started teaching him sign language when he was just 15 years old.

“I guess love is really a function of communication,” Go said, looking back. “Yet sometimes you just need to feel it and leave everything else to God.”

 

 

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