Download Filipino Sign Language Font 2

MCCID FSL FONT complete
Learn Sign Language through your keyboard. Download the first ever Filipino Sign Language Font. You may freely use this font for personal or commercial use. However, a kind gesture of mentioning our school’s name would be highly appreciated. https://www.mccid.edu.ph
The MCCID FSL Font has all the equivalent alphabets and numeric characters that are used in finger spelling and hand sign. The hands used are similar to those with white gloves so special markings like fingernails and hand lines don’t appear. The characters are comic like to make the letters more clear and easier to copy.

MCCID FSL Font is different from other sign language fonts because it presents the uniquely Filipino signs of the letters “E” and “G”. Aside from that, it also has equivalent hand signs for 29 special keyboard characters including the ampersand (&), dollar ($), per cent (%), etc. A total of 65 characters are represented in signs.
MCCID aims for the font to be accessed and installed freely to anybody’s computers in order to promote the learning of sign language and increase people’s awareness in learning this special language of the Deaf people.

MCCID FSL Font 1.0 Features

  • MCCID FSL Font first version is only 135 kb.
  • MCCID FSL Font is a True Type Font. The primary strength of TrueType was originally that it offered font developers a high degree of control over precisely how their fonts are displayed, right down to particular pixels, at various font heights.
  • It can be installed into any PC with Windows Operating System as well as Apple Mac OS 10 and above. It has also been tested for Linux Based OS (Ubuntu).
  • Lower case and upper case hand letters are the same.
  • MCCID FSL Font is a Regular Font. It means you can convert each character into Boldface and Italics.
  • As a dingbat font, MCCID FSL Font does not appear clearly on font size lower than 90. You can better appreciate the font if you change the character size to 100 and above. 300 is the recommended font size.
  • Unlike the Gallaudet American Sign Language Font, British Sign Language Font or Braille Fonts, the MCCID FSL Font offers more than 50 equivalent keyboard characters except for the tilde (~), caret (^) and closed apostrophe (`).

MCCID FSL Font 2 Features

  • MCCID FSL Font 2.0 is slightly lighter at 101kb.
  • Aside from the True Type Font (TTF), MCCID FSL Font is now available in Open Type Font (OTF) which offers a more extended characters. OTF is a joint effort of Microsoft and Adobe and is now more commonly used.
  • The fonts are now with smoother and more realistic hands inside the white gloves.
  • MCCID FSL Font 2 now appears clearly on sizes above 60.
  • The fingerspell of letter “C” is corrected.
  • MCCID FSL Font 2 now offers 72 characters or an additional of twelve from the previous version. Special characters like 1/2, 1/4, division symbol and enye are added.

Download the font by clicking on the link below:

MCCID FSL Font 2.0

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Yay! First 450,000th Visits!

Yehey! I reached a new milestone in my blogging career! I reached my first 450,000th visits! Wait, there’s more! I already reached more than a decade of my blogging career!

Imagine, I have been blogging for eleven years! According to my WordPress Stats, I created this blog in March 6, 2007 when I published my own “Hello World” post.  It had only 18 views. But then I did not consider that as my real post because I was not really that serious in blogging. I made my “real” post more than a year later. I revived my blog by posting on April  27, 2008 because I want to pursue an ongoing news about deaf tourists being offloaded by a budget airline.

On that same month, I was excited to blog so I posted four more. The posts were about our school’s provincial house visits to families of our deaf students. Those were truly both fun and “pissed off” experience for me. A month afterwards, I had my first 1,000 Visits!

Actually, it’s already 452,588 views based on WordPress Stats so I am late celebrating. I have now published 413 blog posts. I also accumulated 284 email followers and 46 wordpress.com followers.

To my faithful readers, thank you thank you very much. Now, on to my next 500,000th visitors. 🙂

 

Filipino Sign Language App ready for download at Google Play

Friends, may I invite you to download and test this app in your Android Phone? I called it Filipino Sign Language (FSL) app. It was quietly released in March 17 and is now on its Version 1.5.  It’s a simple informative program that teaches how to fingerspell letters, numbers and special characters using Filipino Sign Language. I designed this as part of the instructional materials in sign language course offering of MCCID College both in classroom and soon to be online. You can download it for free at Google Play Store.

As an added feature, I included a video of the Philippine National Anthem signed by our deaf student using FSL with instructions on how to sign it. It uses the FSL font, the first and only one of its kind which was exclusively designed and distributed freely by MCCID. It upholds one of our school’s major advocacy of recognizing and spreading the use of indigenous signs.

Designing and developing android applications will also be part of our curricular offerings in the very near future. We have already introduced JavaScript programming in our program last school year and will soon add app development using Java in the coming months.

Although this app is the first full-featured app that was launched in Google Play Store and is now in Version 1.5, there will be more promising FSL apps that will come out in the future and are currently in the development stage. There are also apps that are especially developed and used by religious groups. Let us support all of them.

You may download the app by either going to Google PlayStore and search “Filipino Sign Language” or click on the image below to go directly to download page

Google Play Screen

or click on the link below from our official website using your android smart phone and install it directly.

fsl.apk file

front.fwlupanghinirang.fw.pngpesos.fw.pngcharacters.fw.pnga.fw.pngmenu.fw.png

This latest release was updated based on users’ feedbacks. This update includes:

  • adding exit button on every page when back pressed
  • modified the fonts used in images for clearer view
  • converted images into labels
  • added captions on Philippine National Anthem video with instructions on how to sign.

Feel free to make comments and suggestions on how to improve the app. Thanks!!!

 

 

 

Difference between ASL and FSL

Now that we are still under the topic of sign language, let me explain further to you the difference between American Sign Language and Filipino Sign Language.

I have already shown this image on my previous blog post. But this time, I would like to elaborate more on how each letter came about from the viewpoint of a Filipino.

Letter E

According to a first known study analyzing ethnic differences in the hand spans of pianists, Caucasian male spans are 0.3 inches larger than those of Asian males. Also in this survey,  Caucasian female spans are 0.2 inches greater than those of their Asian counterpart.

Based on this study, Asians genetically have smaller hands compared to the Americans. This also holds true as regards differences in height and build. So, since a Filipino hand is slightly smaller, touching all fingers on top of the thumb would not be clearly distinguished when viewed from at least ten feet away. The hand would be mistaken from letter “O” which also touches the thumb. The solution would be detaching all the fingers from the thumb in order to distinctly see the letter E.

 

e to o.png
Fingerspelled E to  almost O

Letter G

Again, this is also a genetic difference. Unless the reader sees the tip of the thumb protruding above the index finger, it’s difficult to distinguish letter “G” from a hand pointing to the right.

g
Letter G?
g1
Letter G as viewed from the top

So, to solve this “small” problem, Filipino deaf sticks out his thumb to show the letter “G”.

Letter T

Now this one involves culture. A thumb (male penis) sticking out between two fingers  (female vagina) symbolizes sexual intercourse. Everybody in my country understands this hand sign all too well. This was also a “secret” street sign in the old flourishing flesh trade when the American Naval and Air Force Bases are still occupying our land. A pimp would just discreetly motion this hand to the soldiers if they want to hire a hooker.

sexhandsign
Obscene sign

So, if you are a Filipino deaf, would you want to wave your hand using the ASL “T”? Unless you are referring to the “actual thing”, then go ahead! Hehehe

* – Some images posted here were copyright by their respective owners.  

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